Everything about Philip Markle and his one-man, one-hour, part original-musical and part sketch, Sparkle Hour is bigger than life, chock-full of laughs, and deliciously naughty. Sparkle Hour follows Markle, who is as puckish as he is engaging, as he recounts his journey from adolescence to adulthood. Philip Markle’s Sparkle Hour is unconventional, full of vivacity and wit, less than an hour, and a perfect example of what great fringe theatre can be.
— Theatre Is Easy

Bolting through the audience and bounding on to the stage with the conviction of a tent revival evangelist, Philip Markle quickly wins over the audience with his enthusiasm. Mr. Markle’s sly and knowing smile never leaves his face during the 55-minute piece that flies by effortlessly due to the talent and energy of its star. Mr. Markle brilliantly balances the glittery outrageousness of his performance style with amazing storytelling skill. Coming out of his shell with vim and vigor, Markle brings home the message of “Be yourself, love yourself” at the heart of Sparkle Hour!
— Nytheatre.com

Sparkle Hour cleverly juxtaposes adult themes like sex and online dating with the childish concept of playing dress-up. The show includes several truly hilarious moments of self-discovery, including when Markle reenacts his first drunken Grindr hookup with a blow-up doll.
— Next Magazine

CRITIC’s CHOICE: Markle is a huge talent — he mixes storytelling, original songs, and improv to give a fully realized perspective on the experiences he’s sharing. For some transitions, he plays the keyboard. He can really write some catchy songs, and I’ve been singing his “Live Epic” song in my head since the show. Can I haz on iTunes soon, pleez?
— Gaper's Block

Creator Philip Markle in ‘Happy Karaoke Fun Time’ is a standout. He’s hilarious as a Homeless Man in the park goes from a Bizarrely happy “Stewart of Central Park” who hands out Flowers (they’re actually tails of Rats) to somehow doubling as The Father for a date and then trying to row away in a very slow moving boat.
— The Artswire Weekly